The following methods form the core of our work and are essential to our collaboration with selected facilitators and consultants.

Systemic Organizational Development & Consulting

Systemic organizational development is a type of organizational consulting that focuses on understanding and changing the whole system, rather than just focusing on individual problems. This approach is based on the idea that problems are not caused by individuals, but rather by the interactions between individuals and the system as a whole.

Dragon Dreaming Project Design

Dragon Dreaming is a creative method and toolbox for developing and implementing innovative and participatory projects that contribute to social change.

Developed by Australian John Croft and other members of the Gaia Foundation Australia, the method is based on knowledge from chaos and complexity theory, systems theory, and the ancient "Dreamtime" wisdom of the Aborigines in conjunction with the latest insights from organizational development.

The process, tools, and philosophy help in the development and implementation of projects that serve personal development, the empowerment of individuals, groups, and teams, and at the same time care for the environment.

For over 25 years, this approach has been used in over 700 successful projects and is being used on all continents.

Process work 

Process work is a unique approach to understanding the world, people, and groups. It offers a toolbox of methods for working with individuals, couples, families, groups, communities, and organizations.

Beyond just techniques, process work is a form of mindfulness practice. It cultivates awareness of what's unfolding in the present moment, both internally and externally. This allows us to respond organically to what's happening or what's seeking to emerge.

Imagine being "in the flow" – that's the essence of process work. It encourages us to learn from change, to embrace curiosity, and to see challenges as opportunities. Problems become potential gateways to discover new possibilities, beauty, and meaning. Process work helps us find solutions, inspiration, and creative direction within difficulties.

At its core, process work focuses on recognizing the inherent wisdom or intelligence within every experience. By becoming aware of this wisdom, we can harness its potential for growth and positive change.

Founder and Influences

Dr. Arnold Mindell, a student of Carl Jung, pioneered process work in Zürich during the 1970s. Over 30 years of research and development have led to its application in diverse fields:

- Working with body symptoms and psychosomatic issues

- Exploring dreams and their symbolic messages
- Navigating conflict constructively
- Supporting personal growth and development
- Facilitating effective group and organizational dynamics
- Enhancing relationships and family interactions
- Providing process guidance for individuals facing terminal illness or coma

Roots and Inspiration
Process work draws inspiration from a rich tapestry of philosophies and practices:

- Eastern philosophies like Taoism and Zen
- Alchemical principles of transformation
- The depth psychology of C.G. Jung
- Shamanic traditions and indigenous wisdom
- The principles of quantum physics

Nonviolent Communication 

Nonviolent Communication (NVC), also known as Compassionate Communication, is a communication model developed by Marshall Rosenberg. It is a way of communicating that promotes empathy, understanding, and connection between people.

NVC is based on the idea that all human beings have the same basic needs, and that when these needs are not met, conflict can arise. NVC teaches us how to express our needs and feelings in a way that is clear, honest, and respectful, and how to listen to others with empathy and understanding. 

The Benefits of NVC

NVC can be used in a variety of settings, including personal relationships, professional settings, and educational settings. It can help to improve communication, resolve conflict, and build stronger relationships.

Here are some of the benefits of NVC:

  • Improved communication: NVC can help you to communicate more clearly and effectively.
  • Reduced conflict: NVC can help you to resolve conflict peacefully and constructively.
  • Stronger relationships: NVC can help you to build stronger relationships with others.
  • Increased empathy: NVC can help you to develop more empathy for yourself and others.
  • Greater self-awareness: NVC can help you to become more aware of your own needs and feelings.
  • Enhanced problem-solving skills: NVC can help you to develop better problem-solving skills.

Deep Democracy

Deep Democracy is a concept and worldview for describing and designing change and transformation processes on individual and collective levels. It encompasses approaches, concepts, instruments, and intervention methods.

The Core of Deep Democracy

The core of Deep Democracy is the empowerment of individuals and groups. The approach posits that all aspects that arise when working on an issue are important for the further development of the specific group. In addition to facts, this also includes subjective elements such as emotions, hunches, intuitions, dreamlike phenomena, and body symptoms. By consciously perceiving experiences and sensations, more flow and movement are to be brought into blocked situations of organizations and individuals.

History and Applications

Deep Democracy was developed in Zurich in the 1980s by Arnold Mindell and is now used in areas such as organizational consulting, change management, organizational development, leadership training, large group moderation, and coaching.

Deep Democracy is a powerful tool for creating positive change in organizations and communities.

Theory U, Presencing by Otto Scharmer

 A Method for Supporting Creative Processes

With his U-Process, Otto Scharmer provides a framework for generating new ideas and solutions from a state of mindfulness.

The U-Process
The U-Process describes a multi-stage process:

Opening of the Mind: This involves observing, perceiving, and non-judging. It is a state of often internalized behavior.
Opening of the Heart: This involves confronting the void, or the unknown. This moment of unknowing is challenging, but it also promises a breakthrough to new things.
Opening of the Will: From this space of unbiased holding, an impulse, a thought, a feeling, or an image of the new emerges.
Crystallization: The third step is about understanding the new and creating a prototype or model that can be tested in practice.

Leading from the Future
Scharmer describes Theory U as a process of "leading from the future." By opening our minds, hearts, and wills, we can tap into our deepest potential and create a better world.

MyrogAgogik (facilitated grief process) 

Myroagogy: Supporting the Grief Process

Myroagogy is a model for grief process support developed by grief and emotions researcher Jorgos Canacakis.
It draws on his research and extensive experience working with people in mourning. The term "Myroagogy" is a neologism combining the Greek words "myromai" (to lament, weep, mourn creatively) and "agogik" (to guide and accompany).

Inspired by Ancient Traditions

Myroagogy is partly inspired by Myroloja, an ancient Greek tradition of mourning and lament. Myroloja involves improvised lamentations in poetic form, melodies, and texts created spontaneously and collectively during mourning rituals.

LTUM®: Life and Grief Transformation

Dr. Jorgos Canacakis dedicated over 30 years to intensive research, culminating in the development of the LTUM® model and seminar concept. LTUM stands for "Lebens- und Trauerumwandlung" (Life and Grief Transformation) in German. This model adapts ancient wisdom about dealing with loss for application in contemporary culture.

The core of the LTUM® approach is a three-day intensive workshop designed to provide the necessary conditions for healthy grief processing.

Developing Grieving Capacity and Expression

The LTUM® seminar concept focuses on developing a person's ability to grieve and express their associated emotions.

"Not getting swept away, but getting back into the flow of life."

The program emphasizes the importance of a safe and supportive environment. The seminars are carefully designed to create this framework, allowing participants to feel seen, heard, understood, and accepted by the mourning community.

Transforming Grief: From Hindrance to Growth

Myroagogy's core principle is the "transformation" of grief. The aim is to shift grief from a life-hindering experience to one that promotes healing and growth. Compassionate confirmation from the group plays a crucial role in this process.

Empowering Grieving Individuals

Ultimately, Myroagogy empowers grieving individuals to move towards independence and self-responsibility. By reducing fear and facilitating true letting go, the program helps unlock new life energy and enables participants to actively re-engage with life.

Restaurative Circles

Restorative Circles were developed by Dominic Barter in Brazil, in places and with people who are affected by violence and crime on a daily basis.

A New Approach to Conflict

Restorative Circles offer a new way of dealing with conflict. They do not focus on punishing the perpetrators, nor on defining guilt or making amends.

The focus is on restoring the connection between the conflicting parties. To this end, all those affected by the conflict meet as equals in a circle. Their common goal is to listen and be heard, to take responsibility for their own actions, and to agree on new ways to restore the shaken balance.

Restorative Justice Principles

The approach of circle meetings, like victim-offender mediation, is based on the principles of Restorative Justice. This form of justice was formerly widespread in indigenous communities and is still an integral part of some cultures today. It is not about finding the guilty party, but about healing the relationships affected by the act, by having the members listen to each other and take responsibility for their actions.

Restaurative Circles

Restorative Circles were developed by Dominic Barter in Brazil, in places and with people who are affected by violence and crime on a daily basis.

A New Approach to Conflict

Restorative Circles offer a new way of dealing with conflict. They do not focus on punishing the perpetrators, nor on defining guilt or making amends.

The focus is on restoring the connection between the conflicting parties. To this end, all those affected by the conflict meet as equals in a circle. Their common goal is to listen and be heard, to take responsibility for their own actions, and to agree on new ways to restore the shaken balance.

Restorative Justice Principles

The approach of circle meetings, like victim-offender mediation, is based on the principles of Restorative Justice. This form of justice was formerly widespread in indigenous communities and is still an integral part of some cultures today. It is not about finding the guilty party, but about healing the relationships affected by the act, by having the members listen to each other and take responsibility for their actions.

Permaculture

Permakultur

Permaculture has its origins in "permanent agriculture" and is still often associated with gardening techniques. However, in the over 30 years of its existence, it has developed into a comprehensive ethical design system that is still oriented to natural ecosystems.

Permaculture encompasses tools, ecological principles, methods, and an ethic that helps to design and implement ecologically harmonious, efficient, and productive systems.

The goal of permaculture is to provide the framework and knowledge, as well as locally and globally applicable solutions for sustainable lifestyles.

The approach teaches how to use resources better and shows how it is possible to meet material and immaterial needs with less effort without exploiting oneself, other people, or the environment.

The core of permaculture is the innovative design of an ecologically meaningful lifestyle through the construction and design of houses and gardens. In addition, permaculture is increasingly being applied in social systems such as communities and businesses.

In addition, we use methods from systemic work, vision work, social dreaming, and others.

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